Mozart's Birthplace

Mozart's Birthplace

Getreidegasse 9
A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Tel.: +43-662-84 43 13
Fax: +43-662-84 06 93
mozartmuseum@mozarteum.at

Opening hours

Daily: 9 am – 5.30 pm
July / Augst: until 8.30 am – 7.00 pm
(last entry 6.30 pm)

Mozart Residence

Mozart Residence

Makartplatz 8
A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Tel.: +43-662-874227-40
Fax: +43-662-87 42 27 83
mozartmuseum@mozarteum.at

Opening hours

Daily: 9 am – 5.30 pm
July / Augst: until 8 pm
(last entry 7.30 pm)

Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation

Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation


Schwarzstr. 26, A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Great Hall & Viennese Hall

Mag. Reinhard Haring
Rentals, Disposition
Tel. +43 (0) 662 889 40 22
E-Mail: haring@mozarteum.at

Bibliotheca Mozartiana

Dr. Armin Brinzing
Bibliotheca Mozartiana (Director)
Tel: +43 (0) 662 889 40 13
Fax: +43 (0) 662 889 40 50
E-Mail: brinzing@mozarteum.at

Mozart´s original instruments

Mozart´s string instruments:

Mozart's Childhood Violin

 

Mozart's childhood violin was built by the luthier and violin-maker Andreas Ferdinand Mayr, who worked for the Salzburg Court (1693-1764) like it is mentioned on a label inside. The exact date is not readable but it is likely that the instrument was made in the forties of the 18th century.

The size of the instrument is between a ¼ and ½ size violin. Mozart's sister, Maria Anna (Nannerl), owned the precious instrument until 1820, when she sold it to Leopold Trestl in Neumarkt on Wallersee, near Salzburg. In 1829 he passed the childhood violin to an elementary teacher in Neumarkt, Adalbert Lenk. The violin was sold again on September 7, 1877 to the Ambassador to the Holy See in Rome, His Excellency Ludwig Johann, Count of Paar, whose son in turn gave the instrument to the International Mozarteum on February 5, 1896. Since then the instrument has been the possession of the International Mozarteum Foundation, Salzburg.    

 

Mozart’s Salzburg Konzertvioline

The instrument today regarded as Mozart’s concert violin has a label Jacobus Stainer in Absam / prope Oenipontum 1659. The instrument is, however, only “modelled on Stainer” and dates from the early 18th century. 

Mozart’s concert violin was most likely built by a member of the Klotz family of violin makers in Mittenwald, Southern Bavaria.

The body measures 14 in with a maximum width of 8 in; the fingerboard (spruce covered with grenadilla) measures a little over 10 in.

The top is made from decorative spruce and the back from flamed maple.

The instrument is original in all its relevant parts and—unlike most violins for professional use of that period—the neck and fingerboard were not enlarged during the 19th century. 

 

Provenance 

Until Nov. 1780 Concert violin of Wolfgang Amadé Mozart. He apparently left the instrument in Salzburg, when travelling to Munich for the premiere performance of Idomeneo not knowing that he would not return to his native city.
1787?—1820 Maria Anna Mozart, nommé Nannerl, Mozart’s sister
1820 Acquired by Leopold Trestl for his daughter Marie Trestl
1829 Adalbert Lenk (1800—1880), professor at the Dom-Musikverein und Mozarteum in Salzburg, later inherited by his son Franz Josef Lenk
1921 Josef Brandner, apothecary in Schwanenstadt, Upper Austria
1956 Acquired by the Internationale Stiftung Mozarteum, Salzburg

 

 

Mozart´s Costa-violin

 

The instrument was buit by Pietro Antonio dalla Costa in Treviso, Italy, 1764.

Experts are of the opinion that Mozart's Costa-violin is original and complete in all essential parts: back, ribs, top, scroll and varnish. The whole instrument is in a good and absolutely playable condition. The body measures 357 mm in length, and has a maximum width of 204 mm and a minimum width of 112 mm. The top, as usual, is made from spruce and the back is made from remarkably beautifully flamed maple wood.

The length of the neck (including the scroll) of 240 mm indicates that the instrument - just like most old Italian violins made by master craftsmen - has not been preserved in its original condition. 

It may seem strange that Mozart should have owned two violins: the Salz¬burg concert violin and the Costa-violin.The mystery can be solved if one considers the possibility that these instruments were used not at the same time but successively.

Looking at the history of the Mittenwald concert violin, passing through the hands of Mozart's sister, it can be assumed that this instrument has always remained in Salzburg. It is certainly right to assume that Mozart when he left for Munich did not have a violin with him. The fact that Mozart did not take the Klotz violin with him after his last visit in Salzburg as he left for Vienna, might mean that he had no urgent need for the instrument any more. The most likely reason for this would be that he had bought another violin in the meantime.

After Mozart’s death his widow Constance sold the instrument to Johann Anton Andre who left the violin his employee Heinrich Henkel in 1840 with the following remark: “This violin originates from Mozart's estate and Mozart always played it. I bought it from Mozart's widow.”

Heinrich Henkel’s son Karl was a professional violinist and used this instrument for a long time before he sold it to the leading company in violin trade, W. E. Hill & Sons in London in 1909.

An alteration is likely to have taken place already in the 19th century so that the instrument could also be used for the contemporary music repertoire. In its present form, neck, fingerboard, pegs, tailpiece and bridge - parts typically suffering from wear - originate from that 20th century. In all likelihood, they were replaced by W. E. Hill & Sons, and the firm also implemented smaller repairs at the top, in order to bring the instrument to an up-to-date condition after 1909. Now the valuable instrument was part of the Hill-Collection and was kept under wraps till the company was liquidated. 1988 the instrument came into private ownership in Southern Germany. 2013 Nicola Leibinger-Kammüller acquired the violin from the owner on purpose donating the instrument to the Mozarteum Foundation. Since then the Costa-violin is part of the collection of original Mozart instruments. 

Mozart´s Viola

 

The instrument today regarded as Mozart’s viola has a label, which is hard to decipher and seems to read “Paulo Megini [or Megri] Brescia 16.. [possibly 1615]”. Giovanni Paolo Maggini in Brescia (1580—1630), however, did not specify any dates on his authentic instruments. As such, the viola is rather the work of an anonymous master from Northern Italy and dates from the early 18th century.

In its present state the body measures 14 ½ in with a maximum width of 9 in.

The top is made from spruce and the back from maple; the fingerboard consists of spruce veneered with ebony. Unfortunately, the fairly large instrument was reduced to “standard size” during the 19th century by cutting off the margins of the top and back by at least an inch. At the same time the original scroll was replaced by one taken from a German or Austrian instrument.

Provenance

 1791                               Mozart’s estate, inherited by Constanze Mozart

before 1810?                   Johann Nepomuk Zizius (1772—1824), a Viennese lawyer and amateur musician

1826                               Leopold Jansa (1795—1875), a violinist active in Vienna and later in London, who was related to the Zizius family

1875                               Ralph Gordon Noel King (1839—1906), 13th Lord Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Lovelace

1909                               Sir Edward Speyer (1839—1934), Ridgehurst, Shenley (Hertfordshire/GB)

 

1966                               Acquired by the Internationale Stiftung Mozarteum, Salzburg, from heirs of Edward Speyer living in the US

 

Mozart´s Keyboard instruments:

Mozart’s Fortepiano

The instrument is unsigned but can be ascribed to Anton Gabriel Walter (1752-1826), ‘organ builder and instrument maker’ in Vienna.  The piano is one of Walter’s oldest preserved instruments and was probably made around 1782. Walnut wood was used for the body of the instrument; in contrast to a modern instrument the natural keys are black and made of ebony, the accidental keys are white and covered with bone. There is provable evidence that the instrument belonged to Wolfgang Amadé Mozart (1756-1791).  Anton Walter was born in 1752 in Neuhausen auf den Fildern near Stuttgart and moved to Vienna around 1772 where he is known to have lived and worked from 1778 in the Fokanetisches Haus auf der Laimgrube (now the sixth district in Vienna). Walter is regarded as one of the pioneers in building fortepianos in Vienna; for decades he was among the best makers of instruments for professional use.

Mozart acquired the fortepiano before 1785 as a concert instrument and played it regularly in his academy concerts in various concert halls in Vienna. 
After Mozart’s death the fortepiano was owned by his widow Constanze who possibly tried to sell the instrument in 1795 but with little success before her concert tour to northern Germany. In 1810 the instrument was still in her ownership and she passed it on to her older son Carl Thomas (1784-1858) in Milan.
In 1856 Carl Thomas Mozart donated the instrument to the Cathedral Music Association and Mozarteum in Salzburg, the direct predecessor of the Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation. It is part of the permanent exhibition in the Mozart Residence and can be seen in the Dancing Master’s Hall (Makartplatz 8, Salzburg). 

The instrument is unsigned but can be ascribed to Anton Gabriel Walter (1752-1826), ‘organ builder and instrument maker’ in Vienna.  The piano is one of Walter’s oldest preserved instruments and was probably made around 1782. Walnut wood was used for the body of the instrument; in contrast to a modern instrument the natural keys are black and made of ebony, the accidental keys are white and covered with bone. There is provable evidence that the instrument belonged to Wolfgang Amadé Mozart (1756-1791).  Anton Walter was born in 1752 in Neuhausen auf den Fildern near Stuttgart and moved to Vienna around 1772 where he is known to have lived and worked from 1778 in the Fokanetisches Haus auf der Laimgrube (now the sixth district in Vienna). Walter is regarded as one of the pioneers in building fortepianos in Vienna; for decades he was among the best makers of instruments for professional use.

Mozart acquired the fortepiano before 1785 as a concert instrument and played it regularly in his academy concerts in various concert halls in Vienna. 

After Mozart’s death the fortepiano was owned by his widow Constanze who possibly tried to sell the instrument in 1795 but with little success before her concert tour to northern Germany. In 1810 the instrument was still in her ownership and she passed it on to her older son Carl Thomas (1784-1858) in Milan.

In 1856 Carl Thomas Mozart donated the instrument to the Cathedral Music Association and Mozarteum in Salzburg, the direct predecessor of the Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation. It is part of the permanent exhibition in the Mozart Residence and can be seen in the Dancing Master’s Hall (Makartplatz 8, Salzburg). 

 

Mozart´s Clavichord

The modest instrument (141 cm wide, 46 cm deep and 78 cm high) made of polished walnut stands on four round legs.  There is no indication of the name of the maker but it was probably built in the 1780s in Austria or Bohemia.  Unlike modern pianos the natural keys are made of dark stained boxwood and the light accidental keys are covered with bone platelets.  The range of five octaves (contra F to f’’’) corresponds to that of Mozart’s fortepiano (Gabriel Anton Walter, Vienna, around 1780).  The material and workmanship show that it was a perfectly good, usable instrument. 

When Constanze Mozart moved with her second husband Georg Nikolaus Nissen to Copenhagen, the clavichord was stored in Vienna in 1810. When her son Franz Xaver Wolfgang visited her in Salzburg (Constanze lived here since 1820), the instrument was returned to her, as she noted on 11 August 1829 in her diary with obvious emotion. In 1844, two years after her death, it came as part of her son’s estate into the ownership of the Cathedral Music Association, founded in 1841, the immediate predecessor of the Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation. Around 1941 the clavichord was renovated by the Rück Company in Nuremberg, at that time highly reputed for its work on historic keyboard instruments. It had previously also restored the Walter fortepiano.

 

Audio Examples you may find here Mozart Audio-Visual Collection