Mozart's Birthplace

Mozart's Birthplace

Getreidegasse 9
A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Tel.: +43-662-84 43 13
Fax: +43-662-84 06 93
mozartmuseum@mozarteum.at

Opening hours

Daily: 9 am – 5.30 pm
July / Augst: until 8.30 am – 7.00 pm
(last entry 6.30 pm)

Mozart Residence

Mozart Residence

Makartplatz 8
A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Tel.: +43-662-874227-40
Fax: +43-662-87 42 27 83
mozartmuseum@mozarteum.at

Opening hours

Daily: 9 am – 5.30 pm
July / Augst: until 8 pm
(last entry 7.30 pm)

Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation

Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation


Schwarzstr. 26, A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Great Hall & Viennese Hall

Mag. Reinhard Haring
Rentals, Disposition
Tel. +43 (0) 662 889 40 22
E-Mail: haring@mozarteum.at

Bibliotheca Mozartiana

Dr. Armin Brinzing
Bibliotheca Mozartiana (Director)
Tel: +43 (0) 662 889 40 13
Fax: +43 (0) 662 889 40 50
E-Mail: brinzing@mozarteum.at

20th Anniversary of the Rebuilding of the Mozart Residence and 25 Years of the Mozart Audio and Visual Collection

On 26 January 1996, just in time for the opening of the 40th Mozart Week, one of the most important building projects undertaken by the International Mozarteum Foundation was brought to a successful conclusion and celebrated in a special ceremony: the rebuilding of the Mozart Residence.

Fifty-two years earlier, on 16 October 1944 in the first air raid on Salzburg, a 500 kg aerial bomb destroyed two thirds of the house where the Mozart Family had lived for seventeen years. The only part that remained was the wing containing the Dancing Master’s Hall.

Ever since the Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation was created, one of its aims as stipulated in the statutes has been the “worthy preservation of all Mozart memorial sites”, and so immediately after the partial destruction of the Dancing Master’s Hall, vociferous calls were made for it to be rebuilt. At the time the Mozarteum Foundation was unable to purchase the house and so, despite worldwide protests, the building plot with the ruins was sold to the Assicurazioni Generali, which commissioned the architect Josef Becvar to construct a five-storey office building.

In 1955 the Mozarteum Foundation was able to purchase the remaining part of the building but hopes of ever being able to reconstruct the Mozart Residence in its entirety were completely futile.  The Dancing Master’s Hall served to exhibit the collection of musical instruments and was used for chamber music concerts. In 1981 the Mozarteum Foundation set up a museum there to show “Mozart and his Environment in Salzburg” and so, besides the Mozart Birthplace, it became a second Mozart museum in Salzburg. 

At the end of the 1980s, when it became known that the Assicurazioni Generali was looking for a larger building in Salzburg, there was again a ray of hope.  In 1989 the International Mozarteum Foundation was able to purchase the office building and also acquired the Japanese Dai-ichi Mutual Life Insurance Company Tokyo as the principal sponsor for the project. The following years were characterized by several activities to raise funds and collect donations in the form of building-brick campaigns and benefit concerts so as to raise the money necessary for rebuilding the house.

In the spring of 1994 the office building was demolished and work on the reconstruction of the Mozart Residence began. The executive architects Alfred Pointner, Michael Kruckenhauser and the stage designer Pet Halmen created a building based on historic illustrations of the house.  Its appearance was to be as close as possible to how it looked during in Mozart’s time and it was also to provide space for a modern museum and several rooms to be used by the International Mozarteum Foundation.

The Mozart Audio and Visual Collection, founded in 1991 – the largest specialist archives for sound and picture recordings related to the life and œuvre of Wolfgang Amadé Mozart – found its final home here and on 27 January 1996 celebrated its re-opening in the Mozart Residence.  In the rooms of the collection 26,000 audio titles (the oldest dates from 1889) and 3,300 video productions can be monitored. Some musical works are available in over 100 different interpretations.

In the underground vaults beneath the building is the collection of autograph letters and documents as well as handwritten manuscripts by the Mozart Family which belong to the International Mozarteum Foundation’s most valuable possessions. The collection comprises over half of all the known written documents by the Mozart Family.

Nowadays the Mozart Residence is more than a museum that combines tradition with modernity.  It is the place where the diverse activities of all three spheres of the Mozarteum Foundation – organizing concerts, carrying out research, and preserving the museums – come together so that countless visitors from all over the world can come closer to Mozart and experience his genius.

Here you may find the programme of the anniversary.