Mozart's Birthplace

Mozart's Birthplace

Getreidegasse 9
A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Tel.: +43-662-84 43 13
Fax: +43-662-84 06 93
mozartmuseum@mozarteum.at

Opening hours

Daily: 9 am – 5.30 pm
July / Augst: until 8.30 am – 7.00 pm
(last entry 6.30 pm)

Mozart Residence

Mozart Residence

Makartplatz 8
A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Tel.: +43-662-874227-40
Fax: +43-662-87 42 27 83
mozartmuseum@mozarteum.at

Opening hours

Daily: 9 am – 5.30 pm
July / Augst: until 8 pm
(last entry 7.30 pm)

Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation

Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation


Schwarzstr. 26, A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Great Hall & Viennese Hall

Mag. Reinhard Haring
Rentals, Disposition
Tel. +43 (0) 662 889 40 22
E-Mail: haring@mozarteum.at

Bibliotheca Mozartiana

Dr. Armin Brinzing
Bibliotheca Mozartiana (Director)
Tel: +43 (0) 662 889 40 13
Fax: +43 (0) 662 889 40 50
E-Mail: brinzing@mozarteum.at

Latest News

02.12. 2016
Involuntary or malicious misidentification? A “rediscovered” flute concerto „by Mozart“

Against better judgment, a flute concerto by Johann Baptist Wendling in D Major has been presented to the musical world as a work by Wolfgang Amadé Mozart by flutist Şefika Kutluer and the Tutti Mozart orchestra under the baton of Vinicius Kattah. All that is known about the piece is a brief mention in a Mozart letter from Mannheim to his father of 22 November 1777. In this letter Mozart reports that he had attended a rehearsal of a flute concerto by Johann Baptist Wendling, for which he had set the instruments on Wendling’s behalf (“zu welchen ich ihm die instrumenti gesezt habe”). Although considered lost, this instrumentation, a mere friendly turn, not a compositional effort by W. A. Mozart is listed in the Koechel Catalogue since the third edition of 1937 under KV 284e as “Instrumentierung eines Flötenkonzerts von Johann Baptist Wendling.“

In a promotional video (http://www.limelightmagazine.com.au/news/new-%E2%80%98mozart%E2%80%99-flute-concerto-found#sthash.kUdZMVJ7.gbpl) Kattah claims that KV 284e has now been rediscovered in Switzerland by Brazilian flutist James Strauss and that Tutti Mozart „came out with the theory that this is indeed Mozart’s KV 284e after analyzing the music and exchanging emails with all the Mozart experts.“
The promotion of this find is gonzo and unserious for the following reasons:
1. The Wendling concerto under discussion was by no means “recently discovered”, but is known to Wendling and Mozart scholars at least since 1999 when it was discussed by Australian flutist Emily Gunson in her doctoral dissertation on Johann Baptist Wendling. The concerto is listed there as GUN 20. In discussing a potential relationship with KV 284e Gunson came up with the result that the “wind parts of this (1778) concerto do not exhibit any particular merit to justify their attribution. Therefore, either the Wendling concerto connected with this incident is best considered lost, or the added instrumentation by Mozart (K. 284e) has not survived.” (Gunson 1999, pp. 180f.).
2. The only known source for this concerto is found in the university library of Lund in Sweden. That no other source “from Switzerland” is at Mr. Kattah’s disposition is evident from the sample of the source in the promotional video which clearly shows the library stamp of the Swedish library.
3. The wording “after exchanging emails with all the Mozart experts” suggests that these Mozart experts encouraged Mr. Kattah to pursue his idea. The contrary is the case: In an email of 2 September 2016 Mr. Kattah was informed by the Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation that the claims are insufficiently founded.
The Mozarteum Foundation therefore protests against the improper use of images of the Mozart letter of 22 November 1777 which has been used in the promotional video without identifying the source, leave alone asking for permission to use the images previously published on the website of the Mozarteum Foundation as part of the digital edition of Mozart letters and documents (see http://dme.mozarteum.at/DME/main/cms.php?tid=110&sec=briefe&l=). This is the more intolerable since in the email of 2 September 2016 Mr. Kattah was explicitly requested to avoid any impression that the Mozarteum Foundation has been involved in any way with this alleged discovery. 
 

Against better judgment, a flute concerto by Johann Baptist Wendling in D Major has been presented to the musical world as a work by Wolfgang Amadé Mozart by flutist Şefika Kutluer and the Tutti Mozart orchestra under the baton of Vinicius Kattah. All that is known about the piece is a brief mention in a Mozart letter from Mannheim to his father of 22 November 1777. In this letter Mozart reports that he had attended a rehearsal of a flute concerto by Johann Baptist Wendling, for which he had set the instruments on Wendling’s behalf (“zu welchen ich ihm die instrumenti gesezt habe”). Although considered lost, this instrumentation, a mere friendly turn, not a compositional effort by W. A. Mozart is listed in the Koechel Catalogue since the third edition of 1937 under KV 284e as “Instrumentierung eines Flötenkonzerts von Johann Baptist Wendling.“

In a promotional video (see) Kattah claims that KV 284e has now been rediscovered in Switzerland by Brazilian flutist James Strauss and that Tutti Mozart „came out with the theory that this is indeed Mozart’s KV 284e after analyzing the music and exchanging emails with all the Mozart experts.“

The promotion of this find is gonzo and unserious for the following reasons:

1. The Wendling concerto under discussion was by no means “recently discovered”, but is known to Wendling and Mozart scholars at least since 1999 when it was discussed by Australian flutist Emily Gunson in her doctoral dissertation on Johann Baptist Wendling. The concerto is listed there as GUN 20. In discussing a potential relationship with KV 284e Gunson came up with the result that the “wind parts of this (1778) concerto do not exhibit any particular merit to justify their attribution. Therefore, either the Wendling concerto connected with this incident is best considered lost, or the added instrumentation by Mozart (K. 284e) has not survived.” (Gunson 1999, pp. 180f.).

2. The only known source for this concerto is found in the university library of Lund in Sweden. That no other source “from Switzerland” is at Mr. Kattah’s disposition is evident from the sample of the source in the promotional video which clearly shows the library stamp of the Swedish library.

3. The wording “after exchanging emails with all the Mozart experts” suggests that these Mozart experts encouraged Mr. Kattah to pursue his idea. The contrary is the case: In an email of 2 September 2016 Mr. Kattah was informed by the Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation that the claims are insufficiently founded.

The Mozarteum Foundation therefore protests against the improper use of images of the Mozart letter of 22 November 1777 which has been used in the promotional video without identifying the source, leave alone asking for permission to use the images previously published on the website of the Mozarteum Foundation as part of the digital edition of Mozart letters and documents (see). This is the more intolerable since in the email of 2 September 2016 Mr. Kattah was explicitly requested to avoid any impression that the Mozarteum Foundation has been involved in any way with this alleged discovery. 

 


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