Mozart's Birthplace

Mozart's Birthplace

Getreidegasse 9
A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Tel.: +43-662-84 43 13
Fax: +43-662-84 06 93
mozartmuseum@mozarteum.at

Opening hours

Daily: 9 am – 5.30 pm
July / Augst: until 8.30 am – 7.00 pm
(last entry 6.30 pm)

Mozart Residence

Mozart Residence

Makartplatz 8
A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Tel.: +43-662-874227-40
Fax: +43-662-87 42 27 83
mozartmuseum@mozarteum.at

Opening hours

Daily: 9 am – 5.30 pm
July / Augst: until 8 pm
(last entry 7.30 pm)

Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation

Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation


Schwarzstr. 26, A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Great Hall & Viennese Hall

Mag. Reinhard Haring
Rentals, Disposition
Tel. +43 (0) 662 889 40 22
E-Mail: haring@mozarteum.at

Bibliotheca Mozartiana

Dr. Armin Brinzing
Bibliotheca Mozartiana (Director)
Tel: +43 (0) 662 889 40 13
Fax: +43 (0) 662 889 40 50
E-Mail: brinzing@mozarteum.at

Latest News

16.02. 2016
Lost Mozart Composition for Nancy Storace Rediscovered

The German musicologist and composer Timo Jouko Herrmann has rediscovered a long-lost vocal composition by Wolfgang Amadé Mozart from his time in Vienna in the collections of the National Museum in Prague.

In the summer of 1785, the celebrated opera singer Nancy Storace (who later became Mozart’s first Susanna in Le nozze di Figaro) suffered a serious vocal crisis which interrupted her career as a singer in the Vienna Court Opera for several months. To celebrate her recovery Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, his colleague and competitor Antonio Salieri and a certain Mr. Cornetti joined to compose a song of joy Per la ricuperata salute di Ofelia to a text by Lorenzo Da Ponte. Although newspaper advertisements announced that copies of this song of joy were distributed by the Viennese music dealer Artaria, not a single copy could hitherto be located. Not even the text incipit of the poem was known.

The musicologist and composer Timo Jouko Herrmann found a copy of the printed text, a poem in 30 stanzas by the Viennese court poet Lorenzo Da Ponte beginning with the words “Lascia la greggia, o Fillide” when doing research on Antonio Salieri in the collections of the Czech Museum of Music, which are currently integrated into the online catalog of the National Museum in Prague step by step. Unusually this libretto, produced by Joseph von Kurzböck, printer to the Imperial court in Vienna, also includes the musical settings by Mozart, Salieri and Cornetti, though only in a kind of piano score, consisting of the vocal and the bass parts. Herrmann, who has received a doctorate with a thesis on the German-language operas by Salieri, Mozart’s opera rival, recognized the importance of his sensational find immediately and reported it in the Schwäbische Zeitung on 10 January 2016.
Da Ponte’s verses tell the story of the four-month illness of Storace in the style of old Italian pastoral poetry. The title of the poem refers to her role as the first Ofelia in Salieri’s opera La grotta di Trofonio, premiered in the fall of 1785, half a year before Mozart’s Figaro, at the Vienna Burgtheater. Salieri’s opera was originally to be staged already in June 1785 at the Imperial Court Theater in Laxenburg, but had to be postponed due to the illness of the singer.
The piano reduction in the printed libretto gives a first impression of this occasional composition, which seems to have been conceived as a small cantata for voice and instruments. An edition of the work will be issued by the music publisher Friedrich Hofmeister in Leipzig in time for the Frankfurt Music Fair 2016. Mozart’s contribution to the piece starts with the verse “Quell’ agnelletto candido” and comprises 36 measures. A first presentation of the composition in accordance with the 1785 imprint and in a stylistically adequate reconstruction by the finder is planned at the Mozarteum Foundation Salzburg in late February in cooperation with the publisher Friedrich Hofmeister. The little composition is an important jigsaw piece to understand Mozart’s time in Vienna, since it makes it evident that he was on friendly terms with Antonio Salieri. Until today Salieri who in a state of mental illness once asserted that he had poisoned Mozart is in disrepute although he later revoked this claim.
In the Koechel catalogue, the catalogue of all musical compositions by Wolfgang Amadé Mozart, the work is listed as K. 477a since the third edition of 1937 – though hitherto as a lost work. The new state of knowledge arising from this unexpected source find will be incorporated in the new edition of Koechel directory, which is currently being copy-edited at the Mozarteum Foundation Salzburg. Mozart has composed more than 600 works, most of which have been preserved. But even from his Vienna years nearly a dozen works, mostly songs and other occasional pieces, are documented whose music is no longer available.


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