Mozart's Birthplace

Mozart's Birthplace

Getreidegasse 9
A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Tel.: +43-662-84 43 13
Fax: +43-662-84 06 93
mozartmuseum@mozarteum.at

Opening hours

Daily: 9 am – 5.30 pm
July / Augst: until 8.30 am – 7.00 pm
(last entry 6.30 pm)

Mozart Residence

Mozart Residence

Makartplatz 8
A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Tel.: +43-662-874227-40
Fax: +43-662-87 42 27 83
mozartmuseum@mozarteum.at

Opening hours

Daily: 9 am – 5.30 pm
July / Augst: until 8 pm
(last entry 7.30 pm)

Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation

Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation


Schwarzstr. 26, A-5020 Salzburg
Get directions

Great Hall & Viennese Hall

Mag. Reinhard Haring
Rentals, Disposition
Tel. +43 (0) 662 889 40 22
E-Mail: haring@mozarteum.at

Bibliotheca Mozartiana

Dr. Armin Brinzing
Bibliotheca Mozartiana (Director)
Tel: +43 (0) 662 889 40 13
Fax: +43 (0) 662 889 40 50
E-Mail: brinzing@mozarteum.at

Latest News

08.07. 2013
Pen and ink drawing from the early Mozart period acquired by the Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation at an auction

The Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation was recently able to extend its collection with a picture of major musicological significance from the time of Mozart. The depiction by an unknown artist of a concert or a full rehearsal with 24 orchestral instruments made around 1770 was bought in an auction in the Librairie Henri Godts in Brussels.  The picture can be seen until the end of October in the exhibition in the Mozart Residence Mozart Pictures – Pictures of Mozart.

Of the pictures known about among international experts, the astonishingly large scale pen and ink drawing (measuring 46 x 59 cm) is one of the most remarkable portrayals of an orchestra at that time.  It shows the musicians with their instruments, as well as the music on the stands, which is reproduced so precisely that the key and time signatures of the piece being played by flutes, oboes, horns and bassoons are recognizable.

Federzeichnung

Scene showing an orchestra, perhaps with Mozart. Anonymous, ca. 1770

A highly interesting enrichment for the Mozarteum Foundation

Bearing these details in mind the study is a highly interesting enrichment for the Mozarteum Foundation as it shows in exemplary fashion how music scored for a large number of instruments functioned in Mozart’s time: for instance, how many musicians played in an orchestral work, how many of them shared the same music stand, how many types of instruments (for example oboes and harpsichords) were used, how the bass was scored, what was the usual way of holding the bow, whether the keyboard instrument was used with an open lid, and ultimately how the groups of instruments were arranged.

The work of a high quality illustrator

Until now the work was attributed to the German-British painter Johan Zoffany (1733-1810).  However, according to more recent studies this artist can be excluded, but the work must have been created by a high quality illustrator.

The work was previously owned privately and first presented to the public in 1991 in Salzburg. At that time it was assumed that Mozart was to be seen in the picture.  In the meantime the reference to Mozart has been intensely questioned also because the leaf is neither signed nor dated. Since then the pen and ink drawing has become well known in expert literature and has frequently been described because of its attention to detail.

 


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